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Wireless Communication: A Complete Guide to Download Principles of Wireless Networks by Kaveh Pahlavan PDF for Free



- Who are the authors and what are their credentials? - How is the book organized and what are the main topics covered? H2: Principles of Air-Interface Design - Characteristics of the wireless medium and radio propagation - Physical layer alternatives for wireless networks - Wireless medium access alternatives H2: Principles of Wireless Network Operation - Network planning and cellular topology - Mobility management and radio resources - Power management and security H2: Wireless WANs - GSM and TDMA technology - CDMA technology, IS-95, and IMT-2000 - Mobile data networks H2: Local Broadband and Ad Hoc Networks - Introduction to wireless LANs - IEEE 802.11 WLANs - Wireless ATM and HIPERLAN - Ad hoc networking and WPAN - Wireless geolocation systems H1: Conclusion - Summary of the main points and contributions of the book - Recommendations for further reading and learning H1: FAQs - Five frequently asked questions about the book and its topics Table 2: Article with HTML formatting Introduction




Wireless networks are ubiquitous in today's world, enabling various applications such as voice, data, multimedia, and Internet access. However, designing and operating wireless networks is not a trivial task, as it involves many challenges and trade-offs in terms of performance, reliability, security, and cost. To understand and build any wireless network, one needs to have a solid foundation of the principles, technologies, standards, and protocols that govern wireless communications.




PrinciplesOfWirelessNetworksByKavehPahlavanPdfFreeDownloadrar


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One of the most comprehensive and authoritative books on this topic is "Principles of Wireless Networks: A Unified Approach" by Kaveh Pahlavan and Prashant Krishnamurthy. This book presents a true systems approach to wireless networking, covering both theoretical and practical aspects of wireless systems from different perspectives. The book covers a wide range of wireless networks, from cellular to local area to personal area networks, as well as emerging technologies such as ultrawideband and wireless geolocation.


The authors of this book are well-known experts in the field of wireless communications. Kaveh Pahlavan is a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and a pioneer in wireless LANs. He has authored over 200 papers and several books on wireless networks. Prashant Krishnamurthy is an associate professor of information science at the University of Pittsburgh and a former student of Pahlavan. He has authored over 100 papers and several book chapters on wireless networks.


The book is organized into four parts, each consisting of several chapters. The first part introduces the principles of air-interface design, which deal with the physical layer and medium access control aspects of wireless networks. The second part discusses the principles of wireless network operation, which deal with the network layer aspects such as planning, mobility management, radio resources, power management, and security. The third part focuses on wireless wide area networks (WANs), which provide voice and data services over large geographic areas using cellular technology. The fourth part covers local broadband and ad hoc networks, which provide high-speed data access over short distances using wireless LANs or peer-to-peer connections. Each chapter provides a clear explanation of the concepts, techniques, standards, and protocols involved in each type of wireless network, along with examples, figures, tables, exercises, and references.


Principles of Air-Interface Design




The air-interface design refers to the way that wireless devices communicate with each other over the wireless medium. It involves two main components: the physical layer and the medium access control (MAC) layer. The physical layer deals with the modulation, coding, transmission, reception, and processing of signals over the wireless channel. The MAC layer deals with the coordination, allocation, sharing, and contention resolution of the wireless channel among multiple devices. The air-interface design affects the performance, efficiency, robustness, and scalability of wireless networks.


Characteristics of the wireless medium and radio propagation




The wireless medium is the physical medium that carries the electromagnetic waves that represent the information signals. Unlike wired media, the wireless medium is unguided, unpredictable, and variable. It is affected by various factors such as distance, obstacles, reflection, diffraction, scattering, fading, multipath, Doppler shift, interference, and noise. These factors cause attenuation, distortion, delay, and errors in the signals. Therefore, wireless devices need to adapt to the changing characteristics of the wireless medium and overcome its challenges.


Radio propagation is the study of how radio waves travel from a transmitter to a receiver over the wireless medium. It involves modeling and measuring the path loss, which is the reduction in signal power due to distance and obstacles; the channel impulse response, which is the time-domain representation of the multipath effects; and the channel frequency response, which is the frequency-domain representation of the multipath and Doppler effects. Radio propagation models help in predicting and analyzing the performance of wireless systems under different scenarios and environments.


Physical layer alternatives for wireless networks




The physical layer is responsible for converting the information bits into signals that can be transmitted and received over the wireless medium. It involves choosing the appropriate transmission technique, modulation scheme, coding scheme, diversity scheme, and smart receiving technique for each wireless system. The transmission technique determines how the signal occupies the frequency spectrum and how it resists interference. The modulation scheme determines how the signal represents the information bits using amplitude, phase, or frequency variations. The coding scheme determines how the signal adds redundancy or error correction to cope with errors. The diversity scheme determines how the signal exploits multiple paths or antennas to combat fading. The smart receiving technique determines how the receiver processes the signal to enhance its quality or extract its information.


There are many physical layer alternatives for wireless networks, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of the common ones are: - Short distance baseband transmission: This technique uses pulses of different shapes or durations to represent bits over a very short distance (e.g., infrared communication). - UWB pulse transmission: This technique uses very short pulses of very low power to spread over a very wide bandwidth (e.g., ultrawideband communication). - Carrier modulated transmission: This technique uses a sinusoidal carrier wave that is modulated by the information bits using amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK), phase shift keying (PSK), or quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) (e.g., most wireless systems). - Traditional digital cellular transmission: This technique uses a combination of frequency division multiplexing (FDM), time division multiplexing (TDM), and digital modulation to provide voice and data services over cellular networks (e.g., GSM and IS-136). - Broadband modems for higher speeds: This technique uses advanced modulation schemes such as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or code division multiplexing (CDM) to provide higher data rates over cellular or local area networks (e.g., IMT-2000 3G or IEEE 802.11 WLANs). - Spread spectrum transmissions: This technique uses a spreading code to spread the signal over a wider bandwidth than required by the information rate, thus increasing its resistance to interference and jamming (e.g., IS-95 CDMA or IEEE 802.11 WLANs). - High-speed modems for spread spectrum technology: This technique uses adaptive modulation and coding schemes to optimize the data rate and error performance of spread spectrum systems under varying channel conditions (e.g., IMT-2000 3G or IEEE 802.11 WLANs).


Wireless medium access alternatives




The medium access control (MAC) layer is responsible for coordinating and regulating the access of multiple devices to the shared wireless medium. It involves designing and implementing protocols that can achieve efficient, fair, reliable, and scalable communication among devices. The MAC layer affects the throughput, delay, fairness, stability, and scalability of wireless networks.


There are many wireless medium access alternatives, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of the common ones are: - Fixed-assignment access for voice-oriented networks: This technique assigns fixed channels or time slots to devices based on their demand or priority, thus ensuring guaranteed service quality for voice traffic (e.g., FDMA or TDMA in cellular networks). - Random access for data-oriented networks: This technique allows devices to access the medium randomly based on their availability or contention, thus providing flexibility and simplicity for data traffic (e.g., ALOHA or CSMA/CA in WLANs). Principles of Wireless Network Operation




The wireless network operation refers to the way that wireless devices and networks function and interact with each other over the wireless medium. It involves three main components: network planning, mobility management, and radio resources and power management. The network planning deals with the design and deployment of wireless networks to provide optimal coverage, capacity, and quality of service. The mobility management deals with the tracking and handling of devices that move across different wireless networks or cells. The radio resources and power management deals with the allocation and control of radio resources such as channels, power, and bandwidth among devices to achieve efficient and reliable communication.


Network planning and cellular topology




Network planning is the process of designing and deploying wireless networks to meet the requirements and objectives of an organization or service provider. It involves determining the network topology, which is the arrangement and configuration of wireless devices and networks; the network architecture, which is the structure and functionality of wireless networks; and the network parameters, which are the settings and values that affect the network performance. Network planning affects the operational expenditure, capital expenditure, and long-term performance of wireless networks.


Cellular topology is a common network topology for wireless WANs that provide voice and data services over large geographic areas using cellular technology. Cellular topology divides a service area into smaller regions called cells, each served by a base station (BS) that communicates with mobile stations (MSs) within its coverage area. The BSs are connected to a central controller called a base station controller (BSC) that coordinates their operation. The BSCs are connected to a core network that provides switching, routing, authentication, billing, and other services. Cellular topology enables frequency reuse, which is the use of the same frequency channels by different cells that are sufficiently separated to avoid interference. Frequency reuse increases the network capacity and spectrum efficiency.


Cellular topology has several variants depending on the shape, size, and arrangement of cells. Some of the common ones are: - Hexagonal cells: This is the idealized model of cellular topology that assumes cells are regular hexagons that tessellate the service area without gaps or overlaps. Hexagonal cells have six neighbors and can be easily analyzed mathematically. - Square cells: This is a more realistic model of cellular topology that assumes cells are squares that tile the service area without gaps or overlaps. Square cells have four neighbors and can better fit urban environments with rectangular streets and buildings. - Irregular cells: This is the most realistic model of cellular topology that assumes cells are irregular polygons that adapt to the terrain, population density, traffic demand, and interference conditions. Irregular cells have variable numbers of neighbors and can better reflect real-world scenarios. Mobility management




Mobility management is the process of tracking and handling devices that move across different wireless networks or cells. It involves two main functions: location management and handoff management. Location management deals with updating and querying the location information of devices as they move within or between networks. Handoff management deals with transferring the ongoing communication of devices from one BS to another without interrupting the service quality or causing noticeable delays. Mobility management affects the performance, reliability, and user experience of wireless networks.


There are different types of mobility depending on the scale and direction of movement. Some of the common ones are: - Micro-mobility: This is the movement of devices within a single network or domain, such as a cellular network or a WLAN. Micro-mobility requires intra-domain location and handoff management protocols that can handle frequent and fast movements. - Macro-mobility: This is the movement of devices across different networks or domains, such as cellular to WLAN or vice versa. Macro-mobility requires inter-domain location and handoff management protocols that can handle heterogeneous and diverse networks. - Horizontal mobility: This is the movement of devices across networks that use the same technology and protocol stack, such as GSM to GSM or WLAN to WLAN. Horizontal mobility requires compatible and seamless handoff mechanisms that can preserve the network layer connectivity. - Vertical mobility: This is the movement of devices across networks that use different technologies and protocol stacks, such as GSM to WLAN or WLAN to Bluetooth. Vertical mobility requires adaptive and intelligent handoff mechanisms that can handle the network layer changes. Radio resources and power management




Radio resources and power management is the process of allocating and controlling radio resources such as channels, power, and bandwidth among devices to achieve efficient and reliable communication. It involves two main functions: radio resource allocation and radio resource control. Radio resource allocation deals with assigning radio resources to devices based on their demand, priority, and QoS requirements. Radio resource control deals with adjusting radio resources to devices based on their channel conditions, interference levels, and mobility patterns. Radio resources and power management affects the network capacity, energy consumption, and interference management of wireless networks.


There are different types of radio resources and power management depending on the network architecture, technology, and protocol. Some of the common ones are: - Power control in cellular wireless networks: This technique adjusts the transmit power of devices to maintain a target SINR at the receiver, thus reducing interference and saving energy (e.g., closed-loop or open-loop power control in cellular networks). - Distributed joint power and admission control: This technique jointly optimizes the transmit power and admission decisions of devices to maximize the network utility or throughput under QoS constraints (e.g., distributed algorithms based on game theory or optimization theory). - Joint power and admission control in cognitive radio networks: This technique jointly optimizes the transmit power and admission decisions of secondary users in cognitive radio networks to maximize their throughput while protecting the primary users from harmful interference (e.g., distributed algorithms based on spectrum sensing or pricing). - Cell association in cellular networks: This technique determines which BS a device should connect to based on various criteria such as signal strength, load balancing, QoS provisioning, or energy efficiency (e.g., user-centric or network-centric cell association schemes). - Sub-carrier/sub-channel allocation in OFDMA networks: This technique assigns sub-carriers or sub-channels to devices based on their channel quality or data rate requirements in orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) networks (e.g., centralized or distributed sub-carrier/sub-channel allocation schemes). - Resource allocation in relay-based networks: This technique allocates radio resources among devices that use relays to enhance their communication performance in relay-based networks (e.g., cooperative relaying or non-cooperative relaying schemes). - Channel allocation for infrastructure-based 802.11 WLANs: This technique assigns channels to APs to minimize interference and maximize throughput in infrastructure-based 802.11 WLANs (e.g., static or dynamic channel allocation schemes). Wireless WANs




Wireless WANs are wireless networks that provide voice and data services over large geographic areas using cellular technology. Wireless WANs use cell towers to transmit radio signals within a range of several miles to moving or stationary devices. Wireless WANs enable users to access the Internet, make phone calls, send text messages, stream media, and use various applications from anywhere within the coverage area of a cellular network. Wireless WANs differ from wireless Wi-Fi LANs, which use radio signals to connect devices within a short range of a few hundred feet.


There are different types of wireless WANs depending on the generation, technology, and standard of cellular communication. Some of the common ones are: - GSM and TDMA technology: This is the second generation (2G) of cellular technology that uses time division multiple access (TDMA) to divide the frequency spectrum into time slots and assign them to different users. GSM is the most widely used 2G standard in the world, supporting voice and data services up to 9.6 kbps (e.g., SMS and MMS). - CDMA technology, IS-95, and IMT-2000: This is the second and third generation (2G and 3G) of cellular technology that uses code division multiple access (CDMA) to spread the signal over a wide bandwidth and assign different codes to different users. CDMA offers higher capacity, quality, and security than TDMA. IS-95 is the first CDMA-based 2G standard, supporting voice and data services up to 14.4 kbps. IMT-2000 is the family of 3G standards based on CDMA, supporting voice and data services up to 2 Mbps (e.g., WCDMA, CDMA2000, TD-SCDMA). - Mobile data networks: These are wireless networks that provide data services over cellular networks using packet switching instead of circuit switching. Mobile data networks enable users to access high-speed Internet, email, web browsing, video streaming, and other applications from their mobile devices. Mobile data networks include GPRS, EDGE, HSPA, LTE, and 5G technologies. Local Broadband and Ad Hoc Networks




Local broadband and ad hoc networks are wireless networks that provide high-speed data access over short distances using wireless LANs or peer-to-peer connections. Local broadband and ad hoc networks use radio signals to connect devices within a range of a few hundred meters to a few kilometers. Local broadband and ad hoc networks enable users to share files, stream media, play games, and use various applications without relying on a cellular network or a fixed infrastructure. Local broadband and ad hoc networks differ from wireless WANs, which use cell towers t


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